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John Elliott Biography, Wiki, Age, Career, Death, Cause Of Death | Who Was Carlton President John Elliott? Bio, Wiki

Who was John Elliott?

John Elliott (3 October 1941 – 23 September 2021) was an Australian businessman and state and federal president of the Liberal Party. He had also been president of the Carlton Football Club. He frequently provoked controversy due to his political affiliations, his brushes with the law, and his abrasive personal style.

Former Carlton President John Elliott dies at 79

John Elliott, the controversial Australian businessman and former federal president of the Liberal party, has died aged 79.

Elliott was also president of the Carlton football club for two decades before being sacked in 2002 after the club breached salary cap rules.

He was federal president of the Liberal Party in the late 1980s. He tried to stage a political comeback in 2012 by running for the Melbourne city council.

Elliott’s son, broadcaster Tom Elliott, confirmed the death.

“Sadly, my father, John Elliott, died just a couple of hours ago,” he told 3AW radio in Melbourne on Thursday night.

“He had been ill for a few weeks. He had a bad fall a little while back and had been at the Epworth hospital at Richmond. We got the very sad news this afternoon that he had taken his last breath.”

Very sad to learn of the passing of former Liberal Party & @CarltonFC President John Elliott.

He was a proud Victorian and a larger than life figure.

He will be greatly missed and I extend my deepest condolences to his family.

— Josh Frydenberg (@JoshFrydenberg) September 23, 2021

The current federal treasurer, Josh Frydenberg, on Thursday night tweeted: “Very sad to learn of the passing of former Liberal Party & @CarltonFC President John Elliott. He was a proud Victorian and a larger-than-life figure.”

Elliott quit Elders IXL, the former jam company he turned into Australia’s biggest brewery, in May 1990. Earlier that year, the National Crime Authority had started investigating the management buyout of Elders.

When it finally came to nothing, Elliott launched an unsuccessful damages action.

He later moved into rice milling through Water Wheel Holdings, which collapsed in 2000. In 2003, the Victorian supreme court ordered him to pay $1.4m in compensation after finding he’d allowed the company to trade while insolvent.

John Elliott Biography, Wiki

John Elliott, born on 3 October 1941was an Australian businessman and state and federal president of the Liberal Party. He had also been president of the Carlton Football Club. He frequently provoked controversy due to his political affiliations, his brushes with the law, and his abrasive personal style.

John Elliott completed his secondary schooling at Carey Baptist Grammar School in Kew. He then attended the University of Melbourne and graduated with a Bachelor of Commerce (Hons) degree and later completed a Master of Business Administration degree at the Melbourne Business School.

LeaderJohn Howard
Andrew Peacock
John Hewson
Preceded byJohn Valder
Succeeded byAshley Goldsworthy
Personal details
BornJohn Dorman Elliott
3 October 1941
Melbourne, Australia
Died23 September 2021 (aged 79)
Richmond, Victoria, Australia
Political partyLiberal

John Elliott Career

Elliott joined BHP for two years. He then joined the global consulting firm McKinsey & Company and worked in both Australia and the United States for six years. In 1972, he acquired control of IXL, an Australian Securities Exchange-listed food manufacturer.

From there, he and his team built the company up through a string of acquisitions throughout the late 1970s and 1980s, including Australian corporate icons Elders Limited (an agricultural services concern) and Carlton & United Breweries (now part of the Foster’s Group).

The acquisition of Courage Breweries in the United Kingdom, followed by Carling O’Keefe Breweries in Canada- and UK-based Grand Metropolitan Breweries, made the Foster’s Group the fourth-largest brewer in the world. During this time, he was also a high-profile president of the Carlton Football Club (1983–2002) and federal president of the Liberal Party. He was an effective advocate for the club on a range of issues. During his presidency, the club won two VFL (now AFL) premierships.

In 1985, Elliott’s company, by then called Elders IXL, played an important role as a white knight in fending off Robert Holmes à Court’s attempted takeover of diversified mining company BHP. Elders bought a large share in BHP, which blocked Holmes à Court’s attempt to take control. As a result, Elliott joined the BHP board. He then attempted a management buyout of Elders, but this was unsuccessful and left his A$80 million fortune considerably reduced.

Subsequently, the National Crime Authority of Australia (NCA) investigated a foreign exchange transaction undertaken by Elders. Elliott was cleared of criminal charges. He accused the NCA of a vendetta inspired by the then-Labor government, motivated by his position as Liberal Party president. He later launched civil action for damages, which was ultimately unsuccessful.

He was also a director of a number of public companies, including BHP, National Mutual, Bridge Oil, and North Limited. Elliott was a member of the Liberal Party for over thirty years. He held multiple positions in the party, including president (1987–1990), party treasurer, and vice president of the Victorian division. He was Chairman of the 500 Club, which he formed in the 1980s, and was the biggest donor to the Liberal Party in Victoria.

His various political involvements led to him being caricatured in Rubbery Figures, a satirical rubber puppet series that screened in Australia during the late 1980s. He was depicted holding a can of Elders IXL while belching or exclaiming “pig’s arse”.

In 1990, Elliott was a vocal supporter of the Multifunction Polis (MFP), a controversial concept to build in Australia a new “technology city” with a population of 100,000. At the time, the leader of the Liberal Party, Andrew Peacock, was vehemently opposed to the plan, claiming the Multifunction Polis would become an “Asian enclave”.

Carlton President John Elliott

After the 2002 AFL season, Elliott was voted out as president of the Carlton Football Club, a position he had held for two decades. The club was found to have breached the Australian Football League salary cap conditions, which prompted almost one million dollars in fines and other penalties. In a move some thought to be ungracious, given his long service, his name was removed from the club signs at its home ground: Optus Oval, Princes Park.

In January 2005, he declared himself bankrupt, to be discharged in July 2008.

He was a regular guest panelist on the ABC program Q&A, and in 2010 he appeared on the televised Dick Smith population debate, where his vision to harness Northern Australia’s excess rainfall via pipeline to the Murray–Darling headwaters in Queensland received wide support. He featured on talkback radio station 3AW with his son Tom on Fridays and previously (2012) on ABC’s Agony Uncles.

Elliott was the inaugural chairman of the Committee for Melbourne and a director of the foundation of the University of Melbourne Business School. In September 2015, he was made an honorary fellow of the school.

John Elliott Personal Life

He was divorced from the late Lorraine Elliott, a former Victorian state parliamentarian for the Liberal Party. They had three children. The eldest is Tom Elliott (born 1967), an investment banker and radio and television presenter. His daughter Caroline Elliott is vice-president of the Liberal Party in Victoria. 

He also had two children from his second marriage, which also ended in divorce. His second wife, Amanda Elliott, later became the first female chairperson in the Victorian Racing Club’s 153-year history.

Known for his “eccentric, crass and often controversial style of business and politics”, Elliott was also a long-term cigarette smoker and claimed to have considered running for the 2016 Australian Senate on a platform of “Smokers’ Rights”.

Elliott was admitted to the Epworth Hospital in Richmond after suffering a fall in September 2021. He died on 23 September 2021.

John Elliott FAQ’s

Who was John Elliott?

John Dorman Elliott (3 October 1941 – 23 September 2021) was an Australian businessman and state and federal president of the Liberal Party. He had also been president of the Carlton Football Club. He frequently provoked controversy due to his political affiliations, his brushes with the law, and his abrasive personal style.

When did John Elliott die?

John Elliott died on 23rd September 2021.

Who was John Elliott first wife?

He was divorced from the late Lorraine Elliott, a former Victorian state parliamentarian for the Liberal Party. They had three children. The eldest is Tom Elliott (born 1967), an investment banker and radio and television presenter. His daughter Caroline Elliott is vice-president of the Liberal Party in Victoria. 

 

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